faculty

Robert Weston

Visiting Assistant Professor of the Humanities, Director of the Gender & Sexuality Studies Concentration
Robert Weston
Literature, Human Rights Program, Gender and Sexuality Studies. Area of Specialization: 18th-Century European Literature and Cultural History. Biography: B.A., University of Florida; M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia University. Publications in Social Text, Rethinking Marxism, n/or; Invited Lecturer, Guggenheim Museum, NY (2009); Günther-Findel Research Fellow, Herzog August Bibliothek (2004–05); Research Fellowship, DAAD (2000–01). Presidential Teaching Award, Columbia University (2005). Ottaway International Fellow, Director of Faculty and Curricular Development, Bard Honor's College, Al-Quds University, Palestine (2009-2010). Research interests: Primary field: the European Enlightenment; Popular Enlightenment and Social Reform; History of Education; Secondary fields: Walter Benjamin; The Frankfurt School; Theories of Gift and Sacrifice; Foucault, Discourse Analysis. Teaching interests: Enlightenment Cultural History; 18th-Century Intellectual History; The History of Education; The Culture and Politics of Modernity; Philosophical Anthropology. Other interests: Religious Experience (Pietism, Quietism, Mysticism);; Modernism, Expressionism, the historical avant garde; General Economy/Globalization/ World Systems A; The Consumer Society; Philosophical Anthropology; Queer Theory; 18th Century Literature; Radical Formalism; Gender and Sexuality Studies; First Year Seminar.
Contact Information
weston@bard.edu Phone ext.: 7203

Susan Aberth

Associate Professor of Latin American Art History
Susan Aberth

Associate Professor of Latin American Art History with a particular focus on Surrealism.  Additional specialties are in African and Islamic Art.  The English edition of her book Leonora Carrington: Surrealism, Alchemy and Art was published by Lund Humphries of London in 2004 and the Spanish edition by Turner, Madrid the same year.  Currently she is working on the lesbian imagery of the Czech Surrealist Toyen, for which she received a Bard Research Grant during 2007-2009.  She has served as Treasurer for the Queer Caucus for Art of the College Art Association for 8 years. Her other scholarly interests are the art and iconography of Freemasonry, Spiritualism, and the Occult.

Contact Information
aberth@bard.edu

Deirdre d'Albertis

Professor of English, Associate Dean of the College
Deirdre d'Albertis
B.A., Barnard College; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University. Author, Dissembling Fictions: Elizabeth Gaskell and the Victorian Social Text (Palgrave, 1997), and volume editor, Elizabeth Gaskell's Ruth (Pickering & Chatto, 2006). Articles and reviews in Victorian Studies; Studies in English Literature, 1500–1900; Victorians Institute Journal; Journal of the History of Sexuality; and Review. Grants and awards: National Endowment for the Humanities summer stipend (1995) and American Association of University Women American Fellowship (1996). Areas of interest: Victorian literature and culture, gender studies, and narrative theory. Codirector, First-Year Seminar (2006– ). Faculty, The Master of Arts in Teaching Program at Bard College. Areas of specialization: 19th and 20th century British literature, Victorian studies, history of the novel, narrative fiction; narrative theory; feminist theory. Research interests: women's literary history, feminist theory, Victorian literature, 19th century British women's writing. Other interests: single authors: Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot, the Brontes, Virginia Woolf, Thomas Hardy, Henry J; ecocriticism, post-apocalyptic fiction and film; film history, 20th century British cinema; contemporary British fiction. Academic Program Affiliations: Gender and Sexuality Studies, Irish and Celtic Studies, Literature, Victorian Studies.
Contact Information
dalberti@bard.edu. Phone ext.: 7242.

Daniel Berthold

Professor of Philosophy
Daniel Berthold
B.A., summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, M.A., Johns Hopkins University; Ph.D., Yale University. Specialization in continental philosophy (Kant, Hegel, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, existentialism, phenomenology), Freud, and applied ethics (bioethics, environmental ethics, medical ethics). Author of Hegel's Grand Synthesis: A Study of Being, Thought and History; Hegel's Theory of Madness; and The Ethics of Authorship: Communication, Seduction, and Death in Hegel and Kierkegaard. Articles and reviews in journals including Clio, Environmental Ethics, History and Theory, History of Philosophy Quarterly, Human Ecology Review, Idealistic Studies, International Philosophical Quarterly, International Studies in Philosophy, Journal of Speculative Philosophy, Ludus Vitalis, Man and World, Metaphilosophy, Modern Language Notes, Noûs, Philosophy and Literature, Philosophy, Psychiatry and Psychology, Religious Studies, The Review of Metaphysics, Social Theory and Practice, and The Southern Journal of Philosophy. Contributor to The Dictionary of Existentialism. Editorial board, Topoi Library. Academic advisory board member, McGraw-Hill Philosophy Web Resources. Advisory council, The Hastings Center Program in Ethics, Science, and the Environment. Professor Berthold teaches courses in continental philosophy, applied ethics, Freud, feminist philosophy, the philosophy of religion, critical reasoning, and a multicultural introduction to philosophy.
Contact Information
berthold@bard.edu
Phone ext. 7208 (fall), 7280 (spring), Aspinwall 101 (fall), Aspinwall 109 (spring).

Kevin Duong

Assistant Professor of Political Studies
Professor Duong has been at Bard since 2016. He received his Ph.D. in Government from Cornell University and his M.A. in Social Science from the University of Chicago. His research focuses on democracy and political violence, with an area focus on modern French political thought and European intellectual history. He is currently working on a book manuscript that traces how revolutionary violence by “the people” offered a vocabulary of social regeneration during and after the French Revolution. His research has been supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Gustave Gimon Collection at Stanford, among others. At Bard, he teaches classes on the history of political thought, gender and sexuality, and on various topics in modern intellectual history and European political development.

Maria Sachiko Cecire

Assistant Professor of Literature
B.A., University of Chicago; M.St., D.Phil., Oxford University. Areas of specialization include children's literature, medieval literature and its reception, media studies, and cultural studies. Publications include essays in Anglo-Saxon Culture and the Modern Imagination, Arthurian Literature XXVIII, The Journal of Children's Literature Studies, and Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism. Recipient, Rhodes Scholarship (2006). Taught at Oxford University. At Bard since 2010. Academic Program Affiliations: Experimental Humanities, Literature, Medieval Studies, Gender & Sexuality Studies

Christian Crouch

Associate Professor of History, Director of American Studies
Christian Crouch
Assistant Professor of History. A.B., Princeton University; M.Phil, Ph.D., New York University. Research Interests: Frontier violence in the colonial Americas; Cultural brokers and cross-cultural exchange between Native Americans and Europeans; French Atlantic Empire. Teaching Interests: Atlantic empires and early colonial settlement; Native American Studies (Borderlands studies); Comparative Atlantic slavery and cultural retention; American Citizenship and its foundations.

Robert Culp

Associate Professor of History, Chair Social Studies Division
B.A., Swarthmore College; M.A., University of Michigan; M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University. Grants from National Endowment for the Humanities, Spencer Foundation, Fulbright Foundation, American Council of Learned Societies, Committee for Scholarly Communication with China. Specialization in modern Chinese and Japanese history, nationalism, citizenship, education and ideology, ethnicity, and the politics of historical discourse. Articles and reviews in Modern China, Twentieth-Century China, and Journal of Asian Studies.

Sarah Dunphy-Lelii

Associate Professor of Psychology
Sarah Dunphy-Lelii
B.A., Pennsylvania State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan. Contributes articles relating to cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, primate cognition, and autism to numerous academic journals. Has taught at University of Michigan. Research interests: preschooler thinking; social cognition, perspective-taking; autobiographical memory; self-recognition. Teaching interests: Developmental Psychology; Child Development; Preschooler Thinking; Comparative Cognition; Theory of Mind. Other interests: autism; non-human primates (esp. apes).
Contact Information
sdl@bard.edu
Phone ext.: 7621

Cole Heinowitz

Associate Professor of Literature
Program affiliations:Latin American and Iberian Studies, Literature, Gender and Sexuality Studies.

B.A., University of California, San Diego; M.A., Ph.D., Brown University. Previously taught at Dartmouth College, Brandeis University, and Brown. Scholarly articles have appeared or are forthcoming in European Romantic Review; Revista Hispánica Moderna; Oxford Encyclopedia of British Literature; “Sullen Fires Across the Atlantic”: Essays in British and American Romanticism; Connecting Continents: Britain and Latin America, 1780–1900. At Bard since 2004.

Research Interests: 18th- and 19th-century British imperialism; 20th-century British and American poetry and poetics; exoticism/Orientalism; literature and psychology; the gothic
Teaching Interests: Romantic literature; Gothic literature; Romantic imperialism; 20th-century poetry and poetics

 

Elizabeth Holt

Associate Professor of Arabic

Ph.D. in Middle East and Asian Languages and Culture and Comparative Literature, Columbia University.  B.A., Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University.  Also completed graduate work at University of California Berkeley's Comparative Literature program and the Center for Arabic Study Abroad at the American University in Cairo.  Has taught at Columbia University.  Has published book chapters, articles and reviews in Arabic Literary Thresholds, Journal of Arabic Literature, Arab Studies Journal, and Dialectical Anthropology.  Assistant Editor, Journal of Arabic Literature.  Former Fulbright scholar.  Present book project looks at the intersection of the history of the early Arabic novel with the economic landscape of late nineteenth-century Beirut  The project argues that the industrialization of the silk industry produced and was in time informed by an unprecedented explosion in journal production, and in particular the popularity of the serialized novel form.  Teaching interests include modern Arabic literature, especially the novel; serialization and history of the Arabic press; legacies of Francophonie in the Arab world and its diaspora; A Thousand and One Nights; Arab women's writing and the politics of feminism in the Arab world; translation theory and practice; Arabic language pedagogy; theories of nationalism and the production of literary space.

Cecile Kuznitz

Associate Professor of History and Director of Jewish Studies
Cecile Kuznitz
A.B., magna cum laude, Harvard University; M.A., Ph.D., Stanford University. Awarded fellowships from American Council of Learned Societies (1997–98); Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture (1999–2000); National Foundation for Jewish Culture (1999–2000); Center for Advanced Judaic Studies, University of Pennsylvania (2002); Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies (2004); United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (2007). Has lectured at YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, Harvard University, University of Maryland, University of Washington, University of Pennsylvania. Articles published in The Yivo Encyclopedia of the Jews in Eastern Europe; S. Ansky at the Turn of the Century; The Oxford Handbook of Jewish Studies; Yiddish Language and Culture: Then and Now. Visiting Assistant Professor of Jewish history/Jewish studies, Georgetown University
(2000–2003).
Contact Information
kuznitz@bard.edu. Phone ext.: 7543.

Kristin Lane

Associate Professor of Psychology
B.A., University of Virginia; M.S., Yale University; Ph.D., Harvard University. Has taught at Harvard, Johns Hopkins University Center for Talented Youth, and Tufts University. Recipient, Cabot Postdoctoral Fellowship for Innovation in Teaching, Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, Harvard (2006– ). Articles in Social Cognition, Natura Automatyzmow, other journals and publications. (2007– ) Assistant Professor of Psychology.
Contact Information
lane@bard.edu

Allison McKim

Associate Professor of Sociology, Director of the Sociology Program
Allison McKim
B.A., Barnard College; M.A., Ph.D. New York University.
Professor Allison McKim is a sociologist who specializes in gender, punishment & social control, criminology, the welfare state, and ethnographic research. She is particularly interested in how authorities make and enforce rules; the role of gender in law, punishment, and state governance; and how social institutions try to shape the self. Her new book, Addicted to Rehab: Race, Gender, and Drugs in the Era of Mass Incarceration (Rutgers University Press), is an ethnographic comparison of two drug treatment programs for women, one in the criminal justice system and one outside of the penal state in the health care system. In these rehabs, McKim found two very different ways of defining and treating addiction. This book shows how addiction treatment reflects the race, class, and gender politics of the punitive turn. As a result, addiction is a racialized category that has reorganized the link between punishment and welfare provision. While reformers hope treatment will offer a gender-sensitive alternative to punishment, McKim argues that the framework of addiction further stigmatizes criminalized women and undermines our capacity to challenge gendered subordination. Her study ultimately reveals a two-tiered system, bifurcated by race and class. Prof. McKim's research has also appeared in the journals Gender & Society and Signs. In addition, she teaches courses on gender; sexuality; punishment and criminal justice; deviance and crime; governance and the state; feminist theory and intersectionality; and qualitative research.
Website: http://bard.academia.edu/AllisonMcKim
Download: McKim - CV - 2017_online.pdf

Emily McLaughlin

Assistant Professor of Chemistry
Emily McLaughlin
B.S., Ohio Northern University; Ph.D., University of Pennyslvania. Research associate and lecturer at University of Maryland. Recipient, Achievement Award for Distinguished Service to the University of Pennyslvania Chemistry Department (2005); Department of Education GAANN Fellowship (2002–04). Contributor to Organic Letters, Journal of Organic Chemistry, and other scholarly journals.
Contact Information
mclaughl@bard.edu Phone ext.: 2355

David Nelson

Rabbi and Visiting Assistant Professor of Religion
David Nelson
David Nelson earned his B.A. in Psychology from Wesleyan University, received rabbinic ordination from Hebrew Union College – Jewish Institute of Religion, and completed a Ph.D. in Rabbinic Literature from New York University. He spent 15 years on the faculty of CLAL
the National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership) teaching and lecturing throughout the United States and Canada. He also taught courses at Hebrew Union College, NYU and Adelphi University. He came to Bard as Rabbi and Visiting Assistant Professor of Religion in 2008. He is the author of Judaism, Physics, and God: Searching for Sacred Metaphors in a Post-Einstein World, as well as numerous articles in scholarly and popular publications. He is currently writing on theology and emergent models of consciousness. His teaching interests cover a wide range of topics in Jewish life, Jewish classical literature, Jewish thought, and the intersection between science and religion.
Contact Information
nelson@bard.edu

Pavlina Tcherneva

Associate Professor of Economics
B.A., Gettysburg College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Missouri-Kansas City. Previously taught at Franklin and Marshall College and University of Missouri-Kansas City. Research and teaching interests include macroeconomic theory and policy; employment policy; monetary theory and the history of monetary thought; institutional and Post Keynesian theory; and the effects of pro-employment policies on gender outcomes and urban development. She has published articles in the Review of Social Economy, Basic Income Studies, Journal of Economic Issues, Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, International Journal of Political Economy, Rutgers Journal of Law and Urban Policy, and Oeconomicus, among others. She is coeditor (with M. Forstater) of Full Employment and Price Stability: The Macroeconomic Vision of William S. Vickrey (2004). Research Associate, Levy Economics Institute.
Website: http://pavlina-tcherneva.net/

Rebecca Thomas

Dean of the College, Associate Professor of Computer Science
Rebecca Thomas
S.B., electrical engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., computer science, Stanford University. Taught at University of Northern Iowa, Middlebury College, Stanford University. Research at SRI International, AT&T Bell Laboratories. Grants and awards: IBM, National Science Foundation, Stanford University, AT&T Bell Laboratories. Papers include “Domain Semantics for Agent-Oriented Programming” (FLAIRS 2000); “Becoming a Computer Scientist: A Report by the ACM Subcommittee on the Status of Women in Computing Science” (Communications of the ACM, 33:11, 1990; reprinted in 1992, 1997, and 2002 in other print and online publications). Research Interests: Coordination and communication in multi-agent systems; Representation of, and reasoning about, mental status of agents; Adaptive and augmentive communication software tools for communicatively-disabled people. Teaching Interests: Robotics; Introductory programming; Computer architecture; Theory of computation; First year seminar. Other Interests: Societal impact of computing technology; Cognitive science.
Contact Information
thomas@bard.edu

Eric Trudel

Associate Professor of French
Eric Trudel
B.A., Concordia University, Montreal; M.A., French literature, McGill University; Ph.D. in Romance languages, Princeton University. Author, La terreur à l’oeuvre: Théorie, poétique et éthique chez Jean Paulhan Paris, Presses Universitaires de Vincennes, coll. “L’imaginaire du texte,” 2007). Coeditor, Jean Paulhan on Poetry and Politics U. of Illinois Press, 2008); coeditor, Figures et Frictions: La littérature au contact du visuel (Etudes Françaises, Vol. 42, No. 2, 2006) and Accessoire: La Littérature à l’épreuve du dérisoire    (Québec, Nota Bene, 2003). Articles on Jean Paulhan, Pierre Alferi, Chris Marker, George Perros, Remy de Gourmont. Main interests: French literature, especially twentieth-century French literature; poetic discourse; literary theory; literature and philosophy; literature and the visual arts; French cinema; Quebecois literature.
Contact Information
trudel@bard.edu