related events

 

Stay tuned for upcoming events.

 

Past Events

GSS Advising Session

Tuesday, November 27, 2012
4:30 pm – 5:30 pm Kline - Faculty Dining Room
Students interested in Spring course offerings in Gender and Sexuality Studies, or who are interested in the GSS concentration, are cordially invited to an open advising session.

Representatives from GSS Faculty will be present to offer advising and answer any questions you may have.


Drop by for some tea and cookies, and meet with GSS faculty.

Sponsor: Gender and Sexuality Studies Program

Purim!

Saturday, February 23, 2013
7:30 pm – 10:00 pm Kline, Faculty Dining Room
Join us for intensive study of the biblical Book of Esther, plus food and much Purim levity. All are invited but please e-mail nelson@bard.edu to make a reservation by Friday, February 22 (so we can plan appropriate quantities of food). See you there!
Sponsor: Chaplaincy; Jewish Studies Program

Backward Wives or Agents of Revolution? Jews and Gender in Interwar Soviet Life

Thursday, March 7, 2013
4:45 pm Olin 201
Elissa Bemporad
Queens College, CUNY

By focusing on the ways in which one specific group of Jews negotiated between Communism and Jewish identity, Dr. Bemporad will discuss Jewish women’s distinctive path to Sovietization in the interwar period. A wide range of visions of both the Bolshevik experiment and Jewish women’s path to Sovietization influenced the gender discourse on the Jewish street and affected the shifting roles that women came to play in the political, cultural and social life of the Soviet system. Female empowerment, which would have been a natural outgrowth of the Soviets’ commitment to gender equality, eventually met and collided with male empowerment, as Jewish men began to view the “new Soviet Jewish woman” as a dangerous threat to their status, perhaps even more than their non-Jewish counterparts.

Elissa Bemporad holds the Jerry and William Ungar Assistant Professorship in Eastern European Jewish History and the Holocaust at Queens College, City University of New York. She was trained at the University of Bologna and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. She received a PhD in history from Stanford University and is most recently the author of Becoming Soviet Jews: The Bolshevik Experiment in Minsk (forthcoming with Indiana University Press), which received the Fraenkel Prize in Contemporary History awarded by the Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust and Genocide for an outstanding work of 20th century history.

Sponsor: Gender and Sexuality Studies Program; Jewish Studies Program; Russian/Eurasian Studies Program

In a Queer Voice: Journeys of Resilience from Adolescence to Adulthood

Monday, March 18, 2013
7:00 pm – 9:00 pm Olin, Room 102
Researcher and MAT Professor Michael Sadowski reads from his recently published book, In a Queer Voice: Journeys of Resilience from Adolescence to Adulthood.
Sponsor: Master of Arts in Teaching Program
Website: Event Website

Life on Mars: A Reading by Pulitzer Prize–Winning Poet Tracy Smith

Tuesday, April 9, 2013
7:00 pm – 9:00 pm Olin, Room 205
Pulitzer Prize–winning poet Tracy Smith reads from her book Life on Mars.
Sponsor: Master of Arts in Teaching Program
Website: Event Website

Panel Discussion: "Euripides' The Bakkhai: Play and Performance"

Sunday, April 14, 2013
4:00 pm – 5:30 pm Fisher Center
A discussion by four experts of Euripides' tragedy The Bakkhai (The Bacchae), with special attention to the unique features of the current production at Bard's Fisher Center. Free and open to the public.
Sponsor: Classical Studies Program

Sanjoga: Odissi Dance of Cosmic Balance

Monday, September 23, 2013
7:30 pm Bito Conservatory Performance Space in Blum
One of the best Odissi (Indian) dancers in the world, Rahul Acharya and partner Donia Salem will perform "Sanjoga: The Dance of Cosmic Balance." This dance "explores Prakriti and Purusha, masculinity and femininity, the energy and the energetic, and movement and stasis within the context of Odissi dance." The performance will include discussion/demonstration of gender roles in this classical Indian devotional dance.
Sponsor: Asian Studies Program; Gender and Sexuality Studies Program; Religion Program

Let's Get Ratchet: Theorizing Digital Black Feminisms

Monday, October 7, 2013
6:00 pm Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Brittney Cooper is Assistant Professor of Women's and Gender Studies and Africana Studies at Rutgers University, and co-founder of the Crunk Feminist Collective. Her research interests include using Black feminist thought to understand contemporary articulations of Black womanhood, and she has published in both academic journals and major media outlets on this topic.

Coined as a term in the 1990s in Louisiana, "ratchet" has come to offer myriad possibilities for talking about African American working class culture, particularly its gendered dynamics among African American women. Whether discussing the origins of twerking which has a similar genealogical trajectory in the U.S. or speaking about the often tense and severe forms of African American female representation rendered on television, ratchetness embodies a whole constellation of contemporary ideas about African American womanhood. At the same time, ratchetness has been taken up by feminist identified women like those at the Crunk Feminist Collective, as a way to theorize feminist politics among working class women, as a way to critique respectability politics, and as a way to locate the operations of pleasure in Black women's cultural spaces. What then do we mean by ratchetness? How does this term and the practices to which it refers come to be raced and gendered? (e.g. Why don't we understand Kim Kardashian or Miley Cyrus to be ratchet?) How does the circulation of imagery within visual media impact our conceptualizations of ratchetness? And how might digital feminist projects be uniquely poised to intervene and redirect problematic appropriations of ratchet behavior?
Sponsor: Difference and Media Project; Experimental Humanities Program; Gender and Sexuality Studies Program
Website: Event Website

"From the Shtetl to the Lecture Hall: Jewish Women in 19th Century Europe"

Tuesday, October 29, 2013
5:00 pm Campus Center, Weis Cinema
When Europe’s graduate schools began to open their doors to female students in the second half of the 19th century, they were primarily responding to the requests of Jewish women from Russia. Often family breadwinners encouraged to be independent and assertive, they more than other women fought their way into the hitherto exclusively male world of academia. Banned from universities at home, they made Swiss graduate schools the first institutions in the world to train female professionals.

Luise Hirsch was educated at the University of Heidelberg and at Freie Universität Berlin and earned a doctorate in Jewish History from the University of Duisburg in 2005. She lives in Heidelberg and Berlin and works as an author and translator.
Sponsor: Gender and Sexuality Studies Program; Jewish Studies Program

In the Name of the Bara

Thursday, October 31, 2013
6:00 pm Campus Center, Weis Cinema

A Presentation by Anne Ishii

The Internet has been a key force in the circulation of queer and underground manga (comics) beyond Japan. But, as information technologies have evolved over the past decades, so have the politics and practices of queer identity-making. This talk will examine the roles of online communication in changing genres and identifications in queer Japanese manga within its local and global contexts.

Anne Ishii is a writer, producer, editor, and translator based in New York City. She has translated over 20 manga titles, including "Loups Garous" by Natsuhiko Kyogoku, and "Detroit Metal City," a spectacularly raunchy ten-volume manga about an indie rock kid with a black metal alter-ego. She runs Massive, which introduces gay Japanese manga and paraphernalia to an Anglophone audience.

Sponsor: Asian Studies Program; Difference and Media Project; Division of Languages and Literature; Experimental Humanities Program

Epistemology of the Lifeboat

Thursday, November 14, 2013
4:30 pm Reem-Kayden Center
Presented by Tavia Nyong’o

Life of Pi (Yann Martel, 2001) is a widely acclaimed Canadian novel that purports to tell a story that will make the reader believe in God. Who could resist such a dare in a post-secular age like ours? This talk, however, does not focus on the spiritual propadeutics of the novel. Instead it takes up two matters Life of Pi attempts to push as far as possible to the margin: matters of race and matters of sexuality. How does this story — written by and told to a white man seeking Indian enlightenment — differ from its rightfully impugned colonial precursors? And why does a contemporary novel — written well after Stonewall and the long, dark reign of the closet — still repeat certain classically homophobic structures of disavowal and repudiation? And, finally, of what significance to the contemporary debates surrounding zoopolitics and queer posthumanism is the remarkable detail that these questions bob to the surface of the story about a teenager trapped at sea with a Bengal tiger?

Tavia Nyong’o is Associate Professor of Performance Studies at New York University. His areas of interest include black studies, queer studies, critical theory, popular music studies and cultural critique. His first book, The Amalgamation Waltz: Race, Performance, and the Ruses of Memory (Minnesota, 2009), won the Errol Hill Award for best book in African American theatre and performance studies. Nyong’o has published articles on punk, disco, viral media, the African diaspora, film, and performance art in venues such as Radical History Review, Criticism, TDR: The Journal of Performance Studies, Women & Performance: A Journal of Feminist Theory, Women Studies Quarterly, The Nation, and n+1. He is co-editor of the journal Social Text.

Sponsor: Difference and Media Project; Environmental and Urban Studies Program; Gender and Sexuality Studies Program; Literature Program
Press Release: View

"The Movement Beyond Marriage Equality" Gabriel Blau: Executive Director of the Family Equality Council

Tuesday, November 19, 2013
6:00 pm – 7:30 pm Campus Center, Multipurpose Room
Gabriel Blau, who graduated from Bard in 2002, now serves as the executive director of the Family Equality Council. Join us as he speaks about his journey as an LGBT activist, which started at Bard College.
Sponsor: Difference and Media Project; Religion Program; Student Activities

Female Photographers Wanted!

Wednesday, February 12, 2014
Woods Studio
Bard's new literary and art publication, Through the Flower, will be showcasing photography done by women during the first week of March in the gallery at Woods Studio.

The submission process will be open until Friday, February 21st and ALL female student artists are encouraged to submit their photographs! This exhibition is not limited to students in the photography program. 

To submit your work, please include a maximum of (5) five images to ThroughTheFlower@gmail.com. We will be selecting work for the gallery show the weekend of the 22nd/23rd and will notify selected artists in order to obtain their printed images. There will be a website created to showcase all submitted work, including those not featured in the gallery. 

All submissions will be considered for Through the Flower's official publication which will be printed in May.

Female Photographers Wanted!

Thursday, February 13, 2014
Woods Studio
Bard's new literary and art publication, Through the Flower, will be showcasing photography done by women during the first week of March in the gallery at Woods Studio.

The submission process will be open until Friday, February 21st and ALL female student artists are encouraged to submit their photographs! This exhibition is not limited to students in the photography program. 

To submit your work, please include a maximum of (5) five images to ThroughTheFlower@gmail.com. We will be selecting work for the gallery show the weekend of the 22nd/23rd and will notify selected artists in order to obtain their printed images. There will be a website created to showcase all submitted work, including those not featured in the gallery. 

All submissions will be considered for Through the Flower's official publication which will be printed in May.

Female Photographers Wanted!

Friday, February 14, 2014
Woods Studio
Bard's new literary and art publication, Through the Flower, will be showcasing photography done by women during the first week of March in the gallery at Woods Studio.

The submission process will be open until Friday, February 21st and ALL female student artists are encouraged to submit their photographs! This exhibition is not limited to students in the photography program. 

To submit your work, please include a maximum of (5) five images to ThroughTheFlower@gmail.com. We will be selecting work for the gallery show the weekend of the 22nd/23rd and will notify selected artists in order to obtain their printed images. There will be a website created to showcase all submitted work, including those not featured in the gallery. 

All submissions will be considered for Through the Flower's official publication which will be printed in May.

Female Photographers Wanted!

Saturday, February 15, 2014
Woods Studio
Bard's new literary and art publication, Through the Flower, will be showcasing photography done by women during the first week of March in the gallery at Woods Studio.

The submission process will be open until Friday, February 21st and ALL female student artists are encouraged to submit their photographs! This exhibition is not limited to students in the photography program. 

To submit your work, please include a maximum of (5) five images to ThroughTheFlower@gmail.com. We will be selecting work for the gallery show the weekend of the 22nd/23rd and will notify selected artists in order to obtain their printed images. There will be a website created to showcase all submitted work, including those not featured in the gallery. 

All submissions will be considered for Through the Flower's official publication which will be printed in May.

Female Photographers Wanted!

Sunday, February 16, 2014
Woods Studio
Bard's new literary and art publication, Through the Flower, will be showcasing photography done by women during the first week of March in the gallery at Woods Studio.

The submission process will be open until Friday, February 21st and ALL female student artists are encouraged to submit their photographs! This exhibition is not limited to students in the photography program. 

To submit your work, please include a maximum of (5) five images to ThroughTheFlower@gmail.com. We will be selecting work for the gallery show the weekend of the 22nd/23rd and will notify selected artists in order to obtain their printed images. There will be a website created to showcase all submitted work, including those not featured in the gallery. 

All submissions will be considered for Through the Flower's official publication which will be printed in May.

Female Photographers Wanted!

Monday, February 17, 2014
Woods Studio
Bard's new literary and art publication, Through the Flower, will be showcasing photography done by women during the first week of March in the gallery at Woods Studio.

The submission process will be open until Friday, February 21st and ALL female student artists are encouraged to submit their photographs! This exhibition is not limited to students in the photography program. 

To submit your work, please include a maximum of (5) five images to ThroughTheFlower@gmail.com. We will be selecting work for the gallery show the weekend of the 22nd/23rd and will notify selected artists in order to obtain their printed images. There will be a website created to showcase all submitted work, including those not featured in the gallery. 

All submissions will be considered for Through the Flower's official publication which will be printed in May.

Female Photographers Wanted!

Tuesday, February 18, 2014
Woods Studio
Bard's new literary and art publication, Through the Flower, will be showcasing photography done by women during the first week of March in the gallery at Woods Studio.

The submission process will be open until Friday, February 21st and ALL female student artists are encouraged to submit their photographs! This exhibition is not limited to students in the photography program. 

To submit your work, please include a maximum of (5) five images to ThroughTheFlower@gmail.com. We will be selecting work for the gallery show the weekend of the 22nd/23rd and will notify selected artists in order to obtain their printed images. There will be a website created to showcase all submitted work, including those not featured in the gallery. 

All submissions will be considered for Through the Flower's official publication which will be printed in May.

Female Photographers Wanted!

Wednesday, February 19, 2014
Woods Studio
Bard's new literary and art publication, Through the Flower, will be showcasing photography done by women during the first week of March in the gallery at Woods Studio.

The submission process will be open until Friday, February 21st and ALL female student artists are encouraged to submit their photographs! This exhibition is not limited to students in the photography program. 

To submit your work, please include a maximum of (5) five images to ThroughTheFlower@gmail.com. We will be selecting work for the gallery show the weekend of the 22nd/23rd and will notify selected artists in order to obtain their printed images. There will be a website created to showcase all submitted work, including those not featured in the gallery. 

All submissions will be considered for Through the Flower's official publication which will be printed in May.

Female Photographers Wanted!

Thursday, February 20, 2014
Woods Studio
Bard's new literary and art publication, Through the Flower, will be showcasing photography done by women during the first week of March in the gallery at Woods Studio.

The submission process will be open until Friday, February 21st and ALL female student artists are encouraged to submit their photographs! This exhibition is not limited to students in the photography program. 

To submit your work, please include a maximum of (5) five images to ThroughTheFlower@gmail.com. We will be selecting work for the gallery show the weekend of the 22nd/23rd and will notify selected artists in order to obtain their printed images. There will be a website created to showcase all submitted work, including those not featured in the gallery. 

All submissions will be considered for Through the Flower's official publication which will be printed in May.

Female Photographers Wanted!

Friday, February 21, 2014
Woods Studio
Bard's new literary and art publication, Through the Flower, will be showcasing photography done by women during the first week of March in the gallery at Woods Studio.

The submission process will be open until Friday, February 21st and ALL female student artists are encouraged to submit their photographs! This exhibition is not limited to students in the photography program. 

To submit your work, please include a maximum of (5) five images to ThroughTheFlower@gmail.com. We will be selecting work for the gallery show the weekend of the 22nd/23rd and will notify selected artists in order to obtain their printed images. There will be a website created to showcase all submitted work, including those not featured in the gallery. 

All submissions will be considered for Through the Flower's official publication which will be printed in May.

Film Screening: Arranged

Wednesday, February 26, 2014
7:30 pm – 9:30 pm Campus Center, Weis Cinema
A film about a young Orthodox Jewish woman and a young observant Muslim woman who work together at a Brooklyn school and are both in the process of having marriages arranged for them by their families. Discussion to follow led by faculty from Religion, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Middle Eastern Studies, and Chaplaincy.

Sociology Open House

Wednesday, May 7, 2014
2:30 pm – 4:00 pm Kline, President's Room
Come and meet current and returning faculty to learn about courses in the Sociology Program this fall.

All are welcome—whether you are considering majoring or interested in a particular class.

Refreshments will be served.
Sponsor: Sociology Program
Website: Event Website

Peter Rosenblum
 Professor of International Law and Human Rights

 

Wednesday, September 24, 2014
4:45 pm Olin, Room 102
As “corporate social responsibility” enters the mainstream, its
initials "CSR" have become a dirty word for a broad segment of the
engaged public.  The voluntariness, vagueness, and uncertainty of
enforcement  – not to mention blatant propaganda by companies –
overwhelm any positive value, they argue.  At the other end of the
spectrum, CSR enthusiasts insist that it is leading to a new paradigm,
even challenging traditional forms of corporate governance. Oft
overlooked in the debate over CSR is the way in which public campaigns
have driven change and, even more importantly, shaped the mechanisms
that emerge. CSR continues to be as much the story of savvy activists
leveraging global networks as it is the monitoring mechanisms and
codes of conduct -- maybe more so.  Peter Rosenblum will explore the
current debate, drawing on his recently completed research on Indian
Tea plantations and a soon-to-published chapter addressing advocates
and critics of CSR.
Sponsor: Social Studies Division

Conversations in the Bedroom

Thursday, October 9, 2014
5:00 pm – 6:30 pm President's Room, Kline Commons
Join Peer Health and Title IX for a dialogue on effective consent. All are welcome. 
Sponsor: Title IX
Website: Event Website

Uncovering our Radical Queer Past: The History of Homophiles, ACT Up and FBI infiltration

Wednesday, October 15, 2014
5:00 pm – 6:00 pm Kline, Faculty Dining Room
Speaker Jason Lydon is a formerly incarcerated queer, Unitarian Universalist minister and founder of the queer prison abolitionist organization Black and Pink. Black and Pink is an open family of LGBTQ prisoners and “free world” allies who support each other. Black and Pink distributes a newspaper written by prisoners, runs a prisoner pen pal program and supports abolitionist reforms that lessen the harm of the prison system.
Sponsor: Center for Civic Engagement; Gender and Sexuality Studies Program; Queer Straight Alliance; Sociology Program

Prison Industrial Complex Workshop

Wednesday, October 15, 2014
7:00 pm – 9:00 pm Kline, Faculty Dining Room
Jason Lydon will talk about strategies and tactics for abolishing the prison system. Using personal narratives from prisoners, participants will learn how the prison industrial complex affects LGBTQ people and how reformists and abolitionists respond differently to the modern day prison system.

Jason Lydon is a formerly incarcerated queer, Unitarian Universalist minister and founder of the queer prison abolitionist organization Black and Pink. Black and Pink is an open family of LGBTQ prisoners and “free world” allies who support each other. Black and Pink distributes a newspaper written by prisoners, runs a prisoner pen pal program and supports abolitionist reforms that lessen the harm of the prison system.

Sponsor: Center for Civic Engagement; Gender and Sexuality Studies Program; Sociology Program

Sappho: New Voices

Saturday, October 18, 2014
10:00 am – 5:30 pm Olin, Room 204

Presented by the Bard College Classical Studies Program and sponsored by James H. Ottaway Jr.

Bard's Classical Studies Program will host a day-long colloquium on the ancient Greek poet Sappho in light of the extraordinary discovery this year of 
two previously unknown poems. The colloquium will bring together a panel of experts to lead one of the first public discussions of this important new find, reevaluating the context, meaning and implications of Sappho's poetry and her literary world. 

Program: 

10am: Introduction: Lauren Curtis (Bard College) and Robert Cioffi (Bard College)

10.45-12.15: Session 1: Gender and Performance

Timothy Power (Rutgers University): "Performance Scenarios for the New Poems of Sappho"

Melissa Mueller (University of Massachusetts Amherst): "Recentering Epic Nostos: Gender and Genre in the Brothers Poem"

12.15-1.30: Lunch break

1.30-3: Session 2: Sappho and Society  

Kurt Raaflaub (Brown University): "A High-class Trader, Courtesan, and Poetess, a Tyrant, and Archaic Greek-Eastern Interaction”

Deborah Boedeker (Brown University): "Hera and Now"

3-3.30: Coffee break

3.30-5: Session 3: Religious Poetics

Timothy Barnes (Princeton University): "Sappho's daimon: a Reading of the Fourth Stanza"

Albert Henrichs (Harvard University): “What’s in a Prayer? Sappho’s Way with Words"

5-5.30: Round table discussion

Evening performance: 

6pm, Olin Auditorium

Bracko: A reading of Sappho by Anne Carson, Robert Currie, Nick Flynn, and Sam Anderson.

Sponsor: Classical Studies Program
Website: Event Website

Bracko

Saturday, October 18, 2014
6:00 pm Olin Auditorium
Bracko presents the lyric poetry of Sappho, the ancient Greek poet known to many English-speaking readers through Anne Carson’s translation If Not, Winter. In addition to welcoming Sappho’s most distinguished translator to Bard, the event celebrates an extraordinary moment in the history of Sappho’s poetry. Sappho, whose bittersweet poetry on love, longing, and loss has survived the millennia in tantalizing fragments, made headlines in the international press this year because of the rare discovery of two previously unknown poems.

Anne Carson, a classics scholar, poet, essayist, critic, and translator, has won international acclaim across genres. Named a MacArthur “Genius” Fellow in 2000, Carson has published 18 books that defy traditional literary genres—merging poetry, prose, fiction, nonfiction, and translation. Born in Canada, she teaches ancient Greek and is currently Visiting Distinguished Writer in Residence at Bard College. Robert Currie is an artist working in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and New York City. An award-winning American writer, playwright, and poet, Nick Flynn has worked as a ship’s captain, an electrician, and as a caseworker with homeless adults. His most recent book is The Reenactments. A professor in the creative writing program at the University of Houston, he splits his time between Houston and Brooklyn. Sam Anderson is an American book reviewer and author. He is the critic at large for The New York Times Magazine, and was previously a book critic at New York Magazine. In 2007 he received the Balakian Award for
Excellence in Criticism from the National Book Critics Circle.

Bracko is the closing event of a full-day colloquium, Sappho: New Voices, that will be hosted at Bard College on October 18. The colloquium brings together a panel of experts to lead one of the first public discussions of this important new find of Sappho’s poetry, reevaluating the context, meaning, and implications of Sappho’s poetry and her literary world. The full program of talks, which will be held in Olin 204 and is also free and open to the public, can be found here: http://classicalstudies.bard.edu/events/.

Free and open to the public.
Sponsor: Classical Studies Program

Chasing the Hook Up

Thursday, October 23, 2014
7:00 pm – 9:00 pm Olin Auditorium
Mike Domitrz (from Date Safe) will facilitate an open discussion on whether a “Hook Up Culture” exists on your campus, what it MEANS, and how to redirect the mission of students on such a personal quest.

This event will take place in Olin Auditorium at 7:00 pm and run for about 75 minutes – to be followed by a 45 minute panel discussion.

Discover why and how often “Hook Up”s are occurring, especially involving alcohol (sexual assault). Then, gain a new approach to teaching respectful sexual behaviors on college campuses, including sharing the 10 Necessary Steps.
Sponsor: BRAVE, BEOP, DOSA, Health Services, Student Activities, Counseling, and Athletics
Website: Event Website

CANCELLED: 
Frantz Fanon's Clinic

Tuesday, February 24, 2015
RKC 101

CANCELLED
Frantz Fanon is often regarded as an important figure in critical and postcolonial theory, addressing questions of revolutionary violence, racial difference, and colonialism. This paper considers Fanon’s political writings alongside his clinical work, most of which he conducted at the Psychiatric hospital at Blida-Joinville in Algeria between 1953-1956. The paper stages an encounter between the “political” and “clinical” aspects of Fanon’s work to suggest how the clinic emerges as a site of the political in postcolonial studies. In particular, it looks to the way in which the shadow of Fanon’s clinic falls on the theorization on violence, torture, sexuality, and the psyche in postcolonial literary texts.

Sponsor: Dean of the College; Literature Program

Grammatical Gender and Biological Sex: The Invention of Heterosexuality in Ancient Rome

Tuesday, March 3, 2015
6:00 pm Olin, Room 102
This talk explores how the daily use by Latin speakers of a single linguistic category—grammatical gender—cultivates a sensitivity to the role of biological sex in Roman perceptions of both the human and more-than-human realms. The presentation has four parts: first, a demonstration that ancient scholars viewed grammatical gender as intricately connected with biological sex, even in the case of inanimate nouns; next the ways in which an awareness of this identification of grammar with biology enhances appreciation of Roman poetry; third, how the Romans imagined their earliest gods; and, finally, Roman attitudes toward human hermaphrodites and their visual representation. No knowledge of Latin, or of ancient Rome, is necessary.

A Lecture by
Anthony Philip Corbeill
Professor of Classics, University of Kansas
Blegen Research Fellow, Vassar College

Sponsor: Art History Program; Classical Studies Program; Gender and Sexuality Studies Program; Language and Literature

Film: Passing Ellenville

Thursday, March 26, 2015
8:00 pm – 10:00 pm Campus Center, Weis Cinema
Passing Ellenville is an indepent flim by Gene Fisher that was screened at the 2014 World Wide Film Festivals. The film features two transgendered young adults in Ellenville in Ulster County. The filmakers and Film stars will be in attendance for a brief Q & A after the film.

Movie trailer:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pzsbuGYCTJc

A Reading by Rabih Alameddine

Sunday, April 12, 2015
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Campus Center, Weis Cinema
Rabih Alameddine is the author of the story collection The Perv and the novels Koolaids; I, the Divine; The Hakawati; and, most recently, An Unnecessary Woman, a finalist for the 2014 National Book Award. He divides his time between San Francisco and Beirut.

An Unnecessary Woman dramatizes a wonderful mind at play. The mind belongs to the protagonist, and it is filled with intelligence, sharpness and strange memories and regrets. But, as in the work of Calvino and Borges, the mind is also that of the writer, the arch-creator. His tone is ironic and knowing; he is fascinated by the relationship between life and books. He is a great phrase-maker and a brilliant writer of sentences. And over all this fiercely original act of creation is the sky of Beirut throwing down a light which is both comic and tragic, alert to its own history and to its mythology, guarding over human frailty and the idea of the written word with love and wit and understanding and a rare sort of wisdom.

—Colm Tóibín


Introduced by Mary Caponegro and followed by a Q&A, this reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required. Copies of An Unnecessary Woman will be available for sale and signing by Oblong Books & Music.

Sponsor: Difference and Media Project; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Written Arts Program
Website: Event Website

Post-Graduate Scholarships and Fellowships Information Session

Thursday, September 3, 2015
4:30 pm – 5:30 pm RKC 103
Interested in applying for a Fulbright Grant, a Watson Fellowship, or another postgraduate scholarship or fellowship? This information session will cover application procedures, deadlines, and suggestions for crafting a successful application. Applications will be due later this month, so be sure to attend one of these two sessions!

Post-Graduate Scholarships and Fellowships Information Session

Friday, September 4, 2015
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Olin 102
Interested in applying for a Fulbright Scholarship, a Watson fellowship, or another postgraduate scholarship or fellowship? This information session will cover application procedures, deadlines, and suggestions for crafting a successful application. Applications will be due later this month, so be sure to attend one of the  two information sessions!

Reproductive Rights and Responsibilities:
The production of ethical subjects in Mexico City's new public abortion program

Thursday, October 1, 2015
5:00 pm Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Abortion clinics in Mexico City’s new public abortion program do more than provide medical care: they function as venues for the production of ethical subjects of the modern Mexican state. My dissertation examines how a central yet unexposed dimension of public abortion care involves “responsibilization”, a governing technique deployed increasingly in advanced neoliberal democracies (Rose 2000).  Within the public program, begun in 2007, abortion is treated as the result of careless sexual decision-making; clinicians regularly enjoin patients to be more responsible. Invocations of individual responsibility detach abortion from social and structural context such that it emerges as a moral problem of individuals needing ethical reconstitution. Responsibilization is indicative of broader transformations in “reproductive governance” unfolding throughout Latin America alongside the incorporation of neoliberal economic policies and logics that emphasize self-sufficiency (Morgan and Roberts 2012). These changes have important consequences for citizenship. Based on eighteen months of ethnographic research in Mexico City abortion clinics, including interviews with patients and staff, I argue that the program produces sexually (ir)responsible subjects instead of the empowered citizens that feminists and policy-makers had imagined with abortion reform. This moralizing context prevents the internalization of abortion rights, an element I conceptualize as central to reproductive citizenship.
Sponsor: Anthropology Program; Gender and Sexuality Studies Program; LAIS Program; Office of Alumni/ae Affairs

A Talk by Financial Journalist and Editor Carol Loomis

Monday, October 5, 2015
4:45 pm – 5:45 pm Campus Center, Weis Cinema
Carol Loomis inaugurates the John J. Curran '75 Lectures in Journalism Series, introduced by Wyatt Mason.

The venerated financial journalist Carol Loomis is the former senior editor-at-large of Fortune Magazine, and the coiner of the term "hedge fund." The editor of Warren Buffett's annual shareholder letter, she has been recognized by the New York Times for her success in battling gender stereotypes within the financial-services industry, having started her career in the 1950s as one of only two female reporters at Fortune. The Reformed Broker calls Loomis "a lion of financial journalism," while ValueWalk celebrates her as, "without doubt, the greatest business writer of all time."

John J. Curran '75 Lectures in Journalism honors the memory of a proud Bardian whose dedication to ethical reporting in journalism informed a trusting readership for over a quarter of a century and promoted a culture of honesty, integrity, and truth.

Sponsor: Office of Development and Alumni/ae Affairs; Written Arts Program

Reading Sor Juana

Tuesday, October 20, 2015
5:00 pm – 6:30 pm Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium

Edith Grossman is widely considered one of the most accomplished Spanish-to-English translators in the world. Also a literary critic and teacher, she is best known for translating the works of Nobel laureates Gabriel García Márquez and Mario Vargas Llosa, among many others. Grossman's 2003 translation of Miguel de Cervantes's Don Quixote has been hailed as one of the finest English-language translations of the classic Spanish novel. She has been the recipient of numerous awards and honors including Fulbright, Woodrow Wilson, and Guggenheim Fellowships, the PEN Ralph Manheim Medal for Translation, an Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and induction into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Grossman will read from her forthcoming translations of the prose and poetry of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (Norton, 2015). Sor Juana (1651–1695), known during the Spanish Golden Age as "the Tenth Muse" and "The Phoenix of Mexico," is now read as a proto-feminist and early defender of the right of women to a formal education. Grossman will discuss the challenges of translating Sor Juana’s work and will speak of the importance for the contemporary reader of this 17th-century colonial writer and self-taught intellectual. 

Free and open to the public.

Sponsor: Gender and Sexuality Studies Program; LAIS Program; Spanish Studies; Translation Studies

Queer Jewish Heroes and Scoundrels

Monday, November 2, 2015
8:00 pm – 10:00 pm Olin Language Center, Room 115
Rabbi Kerry Chaplin of Vassar College and Rabbi Steve Greenberg will speak about the complicated relationships, past, present, and future, between Judaism and the LGBTQ world. This event is co-sponsored by Religion, Jewish Stduies, Gender and Sexuality Studies, the JSO, the QSA, Trans Life Collective, and the Center for Spiritual Life. Dessert will be served.
Sponsor: Chaplaincy; Gender and Sexuality Studies Program; Jewish Studies Program; Religion Program

Je suis Annemarie Schwarzenbach

Tuesday, February 2, 2016
7:15 pm – 9:15 pm Ottaway Theater

Je suis Annemarie Schwarzenbach is a biopic of the Swiss writer and world traveler of the 1930s, who had a short and intense fate. A free woman, homosexual, and physically androgynous, an anti-fascist activist and great bourgeois—Annemarie Schwarzenbach is an icon of modernity.

Biofilmography
Director Véronique Aubouy is a filmmaker and artist. She has directed some documentary films for Arte, but also fictional short films, such as The Silent of the Summer, chosen for Un Certain Regard (the Cannes Film Festival's official selection) and broadcasted by France's 2 et Canal +. She also directed a film marathon entitled Proust lu. In it, she winds through France and the world to shoot all sorts of people reading, page after page, Proust's In Search of Lost Time. Today, the film is 120 hours long, and it is still far from being completed. Proust lu is shown in museums, as an installation, and has been exhibited at La Force De l'art at The Grand Palais in Paris (2009), at the Kunsthalle in Vienna (2008), and at Villa Medicis in Rome (2007).

Sponsor: Center for Moving Image Arts; French Studies Program; Gender and Sexuality Studies Program

Shocking Pink and on the Street:
Aesthetics of Queer Protest in São Paulo, Brazil

Tuesday, February 23, 2016
5:00 pm Olin LC 120
Recently, the Brazilian public has been inundated with images of mass protest crowds, presenting demands across the political spectrum. These images have come to symbolize Brazilians' uncertainties around a slowing economy, dissatisfaction with elected politicians, and cultural polarization around reproductive and sexual rights. This presentation considers a number of high-profile protests in the city of São Paulo that took place between 2011 and 2013. The talk draws on sustained ethnographic fieldwork within overlapping networks of LGBT activists that mobilized for federal anti-discrimination protections, where I analyzed anti-homophobia and anti-transphobia discourses that circulated between street protests, government reports, and journalists' accounts. During this time, LGBT activists held their own events and joined in protest marches led by organizers for marijuana decriminalization, free public transit, against police violence, and political corruption. Examining protests as sites of oppositional public address as well as experimental spaces for alternative social relations, I focus on rhetorical, aesthetic and affective registers of protest actions. Analyzing palavras de ordem (protest chants), the block colors of the crowd, and interactions with the built environment, I demonstrate how protests make social movements recognizable across multiple contexts.
Sponsor: Anthropology Program; Dean of the College

Oriented

Tuesday, March 8, 2016
6:00 pm Campus Center, Weis Cinema

Featuring a new documentary called Oriented. The film is about the sexual and political identity struggle of three homosexual Palestinians living in Tel Aviv.

The film will be followed by a discussion led by Robert Weston of Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Sponsor: Gender and Sexuality Studies Program; Jewish Studies Program; Muslim Student Organization

A Reading by John Keene

Thursday, March 10, 2016
6:00 pm – 7:00 pm Campus Center, Weis Cinema
The celebrated and award-winning author of books including Annotations and, most recently, Counternarratives reads from his work at 6:00 p.m. in  Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center, on Thursday, March 10th. Introduced by Mary Caponegro and followed by a Q&A, this event is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required. Books will be available for sale and signing from Oblong Books & Music.

John R. Keene's Counternarratives, a collection of stories and novellas, draws upon memoirs, newspaper accounts, detective stories, interrogation transcripts, and speculative fiction to create new and strange perspectives on our past and present. "An Outtake" chronicles an escaped slave's take on liberty and the American Revolution. "The Strange History of Our Lady of the Sorrows" presents a bizarre series of events that unfold in a nineteenth-century Kentucky convent. "The Aeronauts" soars between bustling Philadelphia, still-rustic Washington, and the theater of the U.S. Civil War. In "Acrobatique," the subject of a famous Edgar Degas painting talks back. And the hotly debated, widely praised story "Rivers" presents a free Jim meeting up decades later with his former raftmate Huckleberry Finn.
 
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PRAISE FOR Counternarratives

"Keene exerts superb control over his stories, costuming them in the style of Jorge Luis Borges …Yet he preserves the undercurrent of excitement and pathos that accompanies his characters' persecution and their groping toward freedom." —Wall Street Journal

"An extraordinary work of literature. John Keene is a dense, intricate, and magnificent writer. " —Harper's

"Suspenseful, thought provoking, mystical, and haunting. Keene's confident writing doesn't aim for easy description or evaluation; it approaches (and defies) literature on its own terms." —Publishers Weekly

"Only a few, John Keene among them, in our age, authentically test the physics of fiction as both provocation and mastery. Continuing what reads like the story collection as freedom project, in Counternarratives, Keene opens swaths of history for readers to more than imagine but to manifest and live in the passionate language of conjure and ritual." —Major Jackson

"Keene finds inspiration in newspaper clippings, memoirs, and history, and anchors them in the eternal, universal, and mystical." —Vanity Fair

"John Keene undertakes a kind of literary counterarchaeology, a series of fictions that challenge our notion of what constitutes 'real' or 'accurate' history. His writing is at turns playful and erudite, lyric and coldly diagnostic, but always completely absorbing. Counternarratives could easily be compared to Borges or Bolano, Calvino or Kiš, but at the same time it is a deeply American, resolutely contemporary book, that asks us to reconsider our own perspectives on the past―and the future." —Jess Row

"Of the scope of William T. Vollmann or Samuel R. Delany, but with a kaleidoscopic intuition all its own, Counternarratives is very easily one of the most vividly imagined and vitally timed books of the year. I haven't felt so refreshed in quite a while as a reader." —VICE

"Keene opens up the spaces between words and their objects, to create room where fresh meanings can play." —The Nation

"Queering the script, defying the imperative to be silent, does not require confidence or a vision of what progress means. It is, rather, in all its uncertainty and risk, the most basic stuff of―the very matter of―life. It is also the crowning achievement of one of the year's very best books." —The Quarterly Conversation

"Keene's collection of short and longer historical fictions are formally varied, mold-breaking, and deeply political. He's a radical artist working in the most conservative genres, and any search for innovation in this year's U.S. fiction should start here." —Vulture

"A series of stories in which religion and spirituality, art and language, violence and subjugation, homosexuality and eroticism, may shine through a panoply of voices." —Full Stop

"Practically every sentence in the book perforates, stretches out, or pries open literary modes designed to be airtight, restrictive, and racially exclusionary … An expert generator of suspense, Keene also turns out to be a skilled humorist, a mischievous ironist, a deft, seductive storyteller and a studied historian." —Bookforum

PRAISE FOR ANNOTATIONS

"A dense, lyrically beautiful and highly experimental debut. Composed of short passages open to multiple interpretations, it defies easy description. Annotations could be described as a bildungsroman, as a collection of short recits by unnamed and undetermined narrators, an elegy to the rise and fall of Keene's native St. Louis, a meditation on the African American influence there and much, much more. Keene's masterful prose smoothly transgresses traditional lines of representation and description without ever seeming like an exercise in multi-thematic chaos. Annotations is an experimental work that pinpoints a new direction for literary fiction in the 21st century." —Publishers Weekly

"Keene's slim first novel appears to be a disguised autobiographical narrative whose power resides in formidable imagery and the virtuoso use of language. The plot, if there is one, concerns a young black man's coming of age from birth to college years. Along the way while commenting aphoristically, he encounters many characters with unique personal outlooks and participates in gay and straight sexual experiences that he seems to avoid as often as not. But one does not read this book for its story. In fact, it should be read twice: once to get an idea of events and a second time to savor its language and pounding images. Keene's artistry makes him a writer to watch." —​Library Journal
Sponsor: Written Arts Program

Size Matters to Lesbians Too: Queer Trans Feminist Interventions into Data, Algorithms, and Visualizations

Saturday, April 30, 2016
4:30 pm – 6:00 pm Reem-Kayden Center
How can data visualization multiply rather than simplify narratives? Most data collected about LGBTQ people throughout history has only been used to pathologize and stigmatize.

Drawing upon a queer trans feminist perspective Dr. Giesking examines the relationship between the digital and material spaces of queers and their social and economic repercussions through research completed at the lesbian herstory archives.

This talk is part of our Unconference, which will take place on April 30th from 10:30 to 6:00pm. 

Co-sponsored by GSS. 
Sponsor: Experimental Humanities Program; Gender and Sexuality Studies Program
Website: Event Website

John Cameron Mitchell's
Shortbus

Wednesday, September 14, 2016
6:00 pm – 8:30 pm Campus Center, Weis Cinema
Sponsor: Gender and Sexuality Studies Program

The Blossoming of Maximo Oliveros
(Auraeus Solito, Philippines, 2005)

Wednesday, September 28, 2016
6:30 pm Campus Center, Weis Cinema
Sponsor: Gender and Sexuality Studies Program

Pariah
(Dee Rees, USA, 2011)

Wednesday, October 12, 2016
6:30 pm Campus Center, Weis Cinema
Sponsor: Gender and Sexuality Studies Program

A lecture by Yahoo! Finance editor in chief Andy Serwer

Monday, October 24, 2016
4:45 pm – 5:45 pm Campus Center, Weis Cinema
Andy Serwer presents the second annual John J. Curran '75 Lecture in Journalism, Monday, October 24, at 4:45 p.m. in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center, introduced by Bard writer in residence Benjamin Hale.
 

“Achaea had Homer, the Spanish Civil War had Hemingway, California had the Beach Boys, and now our hyperactive stock market has its own poet singer: Andy Serwer.” —The New Yorker

As editor in chief for the top financial news site, Yahoo Finance, ANDY SERWER oversees all editorial content, from in-depth stories to breaking news to original video programming.

Serwer launched the groundbreaking and enormously influential business-news blog Streetlife in 1997. Now one of the world’s leading business journalists, he worked twenty-nine years at Time, served for eight years as Fortune’s managing editor, and was CNN’s American Morning business anchor from 2001 to 2006.

In 2000, TJFR Business News Reporter named Serwer as its Business Journalist of the Year, lauding him as “perhaps the nation’s top multimedia talent, successfully juggling the roles of serious journalist, astute commentator and occasional court jester.”
 

Andy Serwer will deliver this lecture again at 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, October 25th, at the Bard Graduate Center in NYC. That event is free and open to the public, but online registration is required. Visit the Bard Alumni/ae Network's website to learn more and register.
 

John J. Curran '75 Lectures in Journalism honors the memory of a proud Bardian whose dedication to ethical reporting in journalism informed a trusting readership for over a quarter of a century and promoted a culture of honesty, integrity, and truth.
Sponsor: Office of Development and Alumni/ae Affairs; Written Arts Program

Tarnation
(Jonathan Caouette USA, 2003)

Wednesday, October 26, 2016
6:30 pm Campus Center, Weis Cinema
Sponsor: Gender and Sexuality Studies Program

Gender and Migration in France
and the United States

Thursday, October 27, 2016
5:00 pm Reem-Kayden Center Room 102
 
Over the last four decades, research has moved from the “discovery” of the history of immigration – initially seen largely as a story of male workers – to a “discovery” of female migrants.  Closer attention to the gender composition of migration streams has become an increasingly important aspects of migration studies. Using the United States and France, two major historical sites of labor immigration, as examples, I will show how gender studies bring new questions – and answers – to the understanding of the history of migration.  How have gender regimes in the countries of origin affected emigration and how has immigration affected gender relations?

Nancy Green is professor of history at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris.   She is the author of several books in French and English including Ready-to-Wear and Ready-to-Work: A Century of Industry and Immigrants in Paris and New York and The Other Americans in Paris : Businessmen, Countesses, Wayward Youth1880-1941.    She recently also co-edited (with sociologist Roger Waldinger) the collection of essays, A century of Transnationalism: Immigrants and Their Homeland Connections.
 
Sponsor: Gender and Sexuality Studies Program; Historical Studies Program; Sociology Program

Happy Together
(1997) Wong Kar-Wai

Wednesday, November 9, 2016
6:30 pm Campus Center, Weis Cinema
Sponsor: Gender and Sexuality Studies Program

Undertow [Contracorrente]
(Javier Fuentes-León, Peru, 2009)

Wednesday, November 30, 2016
6:30 pm Campus Center, Weis Cinema
Sponsor: Gender and Sexuality Studies Program

Tangerine
(Sean S. Baker, USA 2015)

Wednesday, December 7, 2016
6:30 pm Campus Center, Weis Cinema
Sponsor: Gender and Sexuality Studies Program

"I am not a Feminist. I am a Graffitera:" Performing Feminist Community without Feminist Identity

Monday, March 6, 2017
4:30 pm Campus Center, Weis Cinema
In cities across the globe, graffiti grrlz (women who write graffiti art) enact the quintessential principles of feminist movement such as collectivity, support, and empowerment. They do so, however, without claiming a feminist identity; some emphatically rejecting a feminist mantle. In her talk, feminist graffiti scholar Dr. Jessica N. Pabón asks: do we need to call ourselves feminists in order to enact feminist change in the world? Incorporating the ethos of “action above words” that defines graffiti subculture, Pabón argues that the question of who is or is not a feminist becomes secondary to how feminism is being enacted through everyday performance.
Case studies are drawn from Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Brazil as well as the United States.
 
Sponsor: American Studies Program; Gender and Sexuality Studies Program; Historical Studies Program; Office of Inclusive Excellence

A Reading by Dawn Lundy Martin

Friday, March 31, 2017
5:00 pm Bard Hall, Bard College Campus
At 5:00 p.m. on Friday, March 31, in Bard Hall, the John Ashbery Poetry Series presents a reading by Dawn Lundy Martin.

The activist poet and editor, winner of the Cave Canem Prize and Lambda Literary Award for Lesbian Poetry, and cofounder of the Center for African American Poetry and Poetics at the University of Pittsburgh is also the author of such books as A Gathering of Matter/A Matter of Gathering, Discipline, and the forthcoming Good Stock Strange Blood.

Introduced by Ann Lauterbach and followed by a conversation and Q&A, the reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

"Every time I read Good Stock Strange Blood, a new, deepened book awaits me. Which is to say, it’s got trap doors, trick sleeves; it takes swerves, detours, and dives. Dawn Lundy Martin’s poems read like a real-time excavation of what poetry can and can't do; how the past is never past; how to stand in the blur, the 'griefmouth' of personal and collective pain and somehow—against all odds—make thought, make fury, make song. We need this resilience, this bloody reckoning, this wit and nuance, now." —Maggie Nelson

"A relentless pressure placed on the body that is fetishized, shackled, split, strangled, beaten, hated, compressed, trashed, drowned, measured, mirrored, dragged, discarded, disappeared, opened, punctured, displayed, encased. The question of 'what allows the body to survive' is at the heart of Good Stock Strange Blood. If there's an answer in this book to that question, then perhaps it has to do with how we confront and give words and breath and sound and silence to a life of meticulously drawn images that are ghostly, brutal, and vivifying." —Daniel Borzutzky
Sponsor: John Ashbery Poetry Series

The Myth of Gender Equality by Suzanne Venker

Thursday, April 13, 2017
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
The phrase “gender equality” is boilerplate language in America, but there is much confusion about this concept due to the way it is defined by those in power. It also does not take into account human desire. This talk will focus on the myths associated with the concept of gender equality, the folks who define equality for us, and the ways in which women can shield themselves from the negative influences surrounding gender equality that will likely undermine their future happiness.

SUZANNE VENKER is a cultural critic, the author of five books, and a nationally recognized
expert on America’s gender war. It is Suzanne’s passion to tell women what the culture won’t—
about men, marriage, work & family—so they can make smart decisions in life and in love.
Suzanne is a Fox News contributor, a columnist at PJ Media and a trustee at Leading Women
for Shared Parenting. Her bestselling eBook, “The War on Men,” was fashioned from her article
of the same name that became the #1 op-ed in Fox News history. The result was a barrage of
media backlash and an appearance on “The View,” where Suzanne enjoyed friendly banter
with guest host Mike Tyson while fielding attacks from Whoopi and Joy.

Suzanne’s forthcoming book (February 2017), The Alpha Female’s Guide to Men & Marriage,
helps women with domineering personalities learn to let go and find peace with the man in
their lives. Her other books include The Two-Income Trap, How to Choose a Husband and The
Flipside of Feminism. Suzanne has written for many publications, including Time, Parents, New York Post, and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. She has also been featured in The Wall Street Journal, as well as in Newsweek, The Atlantic, The Economist, The Huffington Post and London’s Daily Mail. Suzanne’s TV credits include STOSSEL, The View, Fox & Friends, ABC News, CNN, C-Span’s Book TV and more. She has appeared on hundreds of radio shows throughout the country; and her work has been featured on “The Dr. Laura Program,” “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” and “The Rush Limbaugh Show.” Suzanne graduated from Boston University in 1986. Today she lives in St. Louis, MO, with her husband of 18 years and their two teenagers.

Location: RKC 103 [map]
Time: 7pm
Free & Open to the Public
Rsvp not required

Questions: Mark Williams Jr. email: mwilliams0615@gmail.com

Is the Private Political? A Colloquium on Natality, Laboring, and the Body

Friday, April 21, 2017
1:00 pm – 7:00 pm Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Hannah Arendt’s definition of freedom requires our appearance and participation in the public sphere. More fundamentally, it involves our capacity to bring about “the birth of a new world.” Feminist movements since the suffragettes have appropriated this modernist “revolutionary pathos of the absolutely new” to call for a right to freedom. Against their exclusion from politics, women have claimed the political arena to invent new relations between the sexes and redefine femininity as such. Arendt’s approach to natality, labor, and the social question has been employed in thinking about the place of life and reproduction within society and politics.

This colloquium seeks to give a forum to recent debates on the utility of Arendtian concepts for radical feminist and queer politics. Beyond the fixation on Arendt’s division of the private, social, and political realms of life, we would like to discuss the way her concepts of revolution, freedom, natality, and appearance call into question the way sexed bodies appear in public. How can Arendt’s concept of natality serve as a point of intersection where different political agendas meet: from the politics of the body and of birthing, to the possibility of new beginnings, to the inclusion of formerly disenfranchised peoples? Can natality be utilized to form allegiances across gendered, racial, economic, and legal differences? What are the implications of understanding birth, an act coded as private and yet heavily regulated, as already political? How might we reconsider biopolitics from the perspective of natality? 

Location: Reem-Kayden Center (RKC) Room 103 - Laszlo Z. Bito ‘60 Auditorium [MAP] About RKC, click HERE.
Date: Friday, April 21
Time: 1pm-7pm (Subject to change)

For more information, list of speakers, and schedule, please visit: hac.bard.edu/colloquium2017

Free & Open to the Public
Sponsor: Gender and Sexuality Studies Program
Website: Event Website

Middle Eastern Studies 
Open House 

Wednesday, May 17, 2017
5:00 pm Kline, Faculty Dining Room
Come celebrate the end of the year with fellow MESers. Meet faculty, hear about exciting new courses, study abroad programs, senior projects, and a number of incredible iniatives MES students are working on. Snacks will be served. All are welcome.
Sponsor: Middle Eastern Studies Program

Feminisms in Post-Invasion Iraq: Between Militarization, NGOization and the Struggle for a Civil State

Monday, November 6, 2017
6:00 pm Olin, Room 202
This talk will explore Iraqi women’s social, political activism and feminisms relying on an in-depth ethnography of post-2003 women’s rights organizations and a detailed historical study of women’s social, economic and political experiences since the 1960s. Through a transnational/postcolonial feminist approach Ali will look particularly at the context following the US-led invasion and occupation and analyse the realities of Iraqi women’s lives, political activism and feminisms especially the challenges posed by sectarianism, militarism and “global” interferences.

Zahra Ali is a sociologist whose research explores dynamics of women and gender, social and political movements in relation to Islam(s) and the Middle East and to contexts of war and conflicts with a focus on contemporary Iraq. She is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Rutgers university. Her book “Women and Gender in Iraq: between Nation-building and Fragmentation” is forthcoming with Cambridge University Press (2018). She also edited Féminismes Islamiques, the first collection on Muslim feminist scholarship published in France (La Fabrique editions, 2012), and translated and published in German (Passagen Verlag, 2014).


This event is co-sponsored by Human Rights Project, the Sociology Program, and Gender and Sexuality Studies
Sponsor: Middle Eastern Studies Program